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2009 — 45th Chicago International Film Festival

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Saada, Nicolas

Spy(ies) Spy(ies)

With explosive tension and stark cinematography, Spy(ies) is an intense throwback to classic '70s thrillers. French heartthrob Guillaume Canet stars as a bright but underachieving airport worker who gets his hands on the wrong bag-and finds himself thrust into a dangerous world of international agents and life-threatening secrets. This sexy spy flick also echoes the real-life anxieties of French society and plays on the unjust social prejudices wrought from a world of fear.

French with subtitles, 99 minutes

Sabu, _

Kanikôsen Kanikôsen

Kanikôsen takes us into the belly of an industrial hell as exploited laborers aboard the titular crab cannery ship struggle to find escape, or at least respite, from their grim existence. With mass suicide attempted and then rejected as an option, they slowly realize their only recourse is open revolt. Sabu brings a modern sensibility to his adaptation of the 1929 novel, adding stylized visuals and his trademark flourishes of black comedy.

Japanese with English subtitles, 109 minutes

Scott, Kiel Adrian

The Roe Effect The Roe Effect

High schooler Dawn and her girlfriend Sam are madly in love, but when Dawn winds up pregnant she must choose between exposing a painful truth and losing the girl she loves.

The Roe Effect will be presented as part of the short film program, Shorts 5: Best of the American Black Film Festival: Information & Show Times

19 minutes

Silva, Sebastian

The Maid The Maid

Raquel has spent half her life as the live-in housekeeper and nanny for a family of six. Her ironfisted, borderline-OCD behavior keeps things running smoothly, but lately her snappishness is creating a strange tension in the household. Hoping to relieve her stress, the family brings in a second maid, but Raquel is prepared to defend her territory at all costs. This unpredictable, naturalistic gem was a top winner at Sundance.

Spanish with subtitles, 94 minutes

Sitch, Rob

Roger Ebert presents 'The Castle' Roger Ebert presents 'The Castle'

Early in The Castle, the happy Kerrigan family is served a chicken dinner. Dad (Michael Caton) observes something on the chicken and asks his wife (Anne Tenney) what it is. "Seasoning," she says proudly. Dad beams: "Seasoning! Looks like everybody's kicked a goal."

And so life spins along in Melbourne, where the Kerrigan home sits surrounded by its built-on rooms, screened-in porch, greyhound kennel, big-dish satellite and carport. For Darryl, it is not so much a house as a shrine to one of the best darn families in the universe, and he proudly points out the plastic Victorian gingerbread trim and the fake chimney.

The Castle, directed by Rob Sitch, is one of those comic treasures like The Full Monty and Waking Ned Devine, that shows its characters in the full bloom of glorious eccentricity. The Kerrigans may be the proudest and happiest family you've ever met, what with dad's prosperous tow-truck business, and the inventions of Steve (Anthony Simcoe), the "idea man" who specializes in fitting tools together so they can do two jobs equally badly. Tracy (Sophie Lee) is the only college graduate (from beauty school), and Dale (Stephen Curry) is the narrator, frequently quoting his dad, who observes, as he gazes up at pylons towering over the home, that "power lines are a reminder of man's ability to generate electricity."

This is the sort of movie the British used to make in black and white, starring Peter Sellers, Alec Guinness, Terry-Thomas, and Ian Carmichael. It's about characters who have a rock-solid view of the universe and their place in it, and gaze out upon the world in sublime contentment.

"Of all the films I've shown at Ebertfest, the audience probably loved" – Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert is Chicago’s own legendary, Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic. An integral part of the Chicago International Film Festival since its early years, Roger went on to form his Overlooked Film Festival in 1999. Now known simply as Ebertfest, the annual event highlights films both new and old that deserve wider attention or a fresh look by a new audience. Join us for this special presentation of The Castle, an Ebertfest film handpicked by Roger for Chicago.

82 minutes

The Castle The Castle

Early in The Castle, the happy Kerrigan family is served a chicken dinner. Dad (Michael Caton) observes something on the chicken and asks his wife (Anne Tenney) what it is. "Seasoning," she says proudly. Dad beams: "Seasoning! Looks like everybody's kicked a goal."

And so life spins along in Melbourne, where the Kerrigan home sits surrounded by its built-on rooms, screened-in porch, greyhound kennel, big-dish satellite and carport. For Darryl, it is not so much a house as a shrine to one of the best darn families in the universe, and he proudly points out the plastic Victorian gingerbread trim and the fake chimney.

The Castle, directed by Rob Sitch, is one of those comic treasures like The Full Monty and Waking Ned Devine, that shows its characters in the full bloom of glorious eccentricity. The Kerrigans may be the proudest and happiest family you've ever met, what with dad's prosperous tow-truck business, and the inventions of Steve (Anthony Simcoe), the "idea man" who specializes in fitting tools together so they can do two jobs equally badly. Tracy (Sophie Lee) is the only college graduate (from beauty school), and Dale (Stephen Curry) is the narrator, frequently quoting his dad, who observes, as he gazes up at pylons towering over the home, that "power lines are a reminder of man's ability to generate electricity."

This is the sort of movie the British used to make in black and white, starring Peter Sellers, Alec Guinness, Terry-Thomas, and Ian Carmichael. It's about characters who have a rock-solid view of the universe and their place in it, and gaze out upon the world in sublime contentment.

"Of all the films I've shown at Ebertfest, the audience probably loved" – Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert is Chicago’s own legendary, Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic. An integral part of the Chicago International Film Festival since its early years, Roger went on to form his Overlooked Film Festival in 1999. Now known simply as Ebertfest, the annual event highlights films both new and old that deserve wider attention or a fresh look by a new audience. Join us for this special presentation of The Castle, an Ebertfest film handpicked by Roger for Chicago.

The Castle will be presented as part of the special program, Roger Ebert Presents...: Information & Show Times

82 minutes

Now showing rows 1 - 5 of 9