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2009 — 45th Chicago International Film Festival

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Argentina

Green Waters Green Waters

Juan can't wait to start his family holiday at the beach, but a deep reserve of paternal paranoia is tapped when his teenage daughter meets leather-jacket-wearing, motorcycle-riding Roberto at a gas station on the way. Roberto resurfaces at the beach, and soon Juan's whole family is smitten by his charms. Subtle suspense—often hidden by sun-bright visuals and comedy—builds to a stunning climax in this offbeat debut.

Spanish with subtitles, 89 minutes

Australia

Cedar Boys Cedar Boys

For Tarek, a young Lebanese man living with his parents in suburban Sydney, everything he wants seems just out of reach

106 minutes

Coffin Rock Coffin Rock

A small-town love triangle turns deadly in this chilling thriller from the producer of Wolf Creek. Jess and Rob are happily married, but the stress of three long years without being able to conceive propels Jess into the arms of Evan, a young stranger whose interest in her borders on the obsessive. Already wracked with guilt, Jess will pay an even bigger price for her adultery when she finds out she's pregnant….

89 minutes

Mary and Max Mary and Max

A lonely Australian girl and a middle-aged New Yorker form a lifelong friendship through letters in the alternately comic and tragic Mary and Max. Inventive and endearing stop-motion animation brings the eccentric characters to vividly expressive life. The dark, ironically humorous script is empathetically played by a strong voice cast, with Toni Collette and Philip Seymour Hoffman as the title characters.

92 minutes

Roger Ebert presents 'The Castle' Roger Ebert presents 'The Castle'

Early in The Castle, the happy Kerrigan family is served a chicken dinner. Dad (Michael Caton) observes something on the chicken and asks his wife (Anne Tenney) what it is. "Seasoning," she says proudly. Dad beams: "Seasoning! Looks like everybody's kicked a goal."

And so life spins along in Melbourne, where the Kerrigan home sits surrounded by its built-on rooms, screened-in porch, greyhound kennel, big-dish satellite and carport. For Darryl, it is not so much a house as a shrine to one of the best darn families in the universe, and he proudly points out the plastic Victorian gingerbread trim and the fake chimney.

The Castle, directed by Rob Sitch, is one of those comic treasures like The Full Monty and Waking Ned Devine, that shows its characters in the full bloom of glorious eccentricity. The Kerrigans may be the proudest and happiest family you've ever met, what with dad's prosperous tow-truck business, and the inventions of Steve (Anthony Simcoe), the "idea man" who specializes in fitting tools together so they can do two jobs equally badly. Tracy (Sophie Lee) is the only college graduate (from beauty school), and Dale (Stephen Curry) is the narrator, frequently quoting his dad, who observes, as he gazes up at pylons towering over the home, that "power lines are a reminder of man's ability to generate electricity."

This is the sort of movie the British used to make in black and white, starring Peter Sellers, Alec Guinness, Terry-Thomas, and Ian Carmichael. It's about characters who have a rock-solid view of the universe and their place in it, and gaze out upon the world in sublime contentment.

"Of all the films I've shown at Ebertfest, the audience probably loved" – Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert is Chicago’s own legendary, Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic. An integral part of the Chicago International Film Festival since its early years, Roger went on to form his Overlooked Film Festival in 1999. Now known simply as Ebertfest, the annual event highlights films both new and old that deserve wider attention or a fresh look by a new audience. Join us for this special presentation of The Castle, an Ebertfest film handpicked by Roger for Chicago.

82 minutes

Young Love Young Love

Erno is in tortuous pain, but danger is following him, so he must keep running. Young Love illustrates why clarity can often be found in the eyes of strangers.

Young Love will be presented as part of the short film program, Shorts 3: Rediscovery: Information & Show Times

7 minutes

The Castle The Castle

Early in The Castle, the happy Kerrigan family is served a chicken dinner. Dad (Michael Caton) observes something on the chicken and asks his wife (Anne Tenney) what it is. "Seasoning," she says proudly. Dad beams: "Seasoning! Looks like everybody's kicked a goal."

And so life spins along in Melbourne, where the Kerrigan home sits surrounded by its built-on rooms, screened-in porch, greyhound kennel, big-dish satellite and carport. For Darryl, it is not so much a house as a shrine to one of the best darn families in the universe, and he proudly points out the plastic Victorian gingerbread trim and the fake chimney.

The Castle, directed by Rob Sitch, is one of those comic treasures like The Full Monty and Waking Ned Devine, that shows its characters in the full bloom of glorious eccentricity. The Kerrigans may be the proudest and happiest family you've ever met, what with dad's prosperous tow-truck business, and the inventions of Steve (Anthony Simcoe), the "idea man" who specializes in fitting tools together so they can do two jobs equally badly. Tracy (Sophie Lee) is the only college graduate (from beauty school), and Dale (Stephen Curry) is the narrator, frequently quoting his dad, who observes, as he gazes up at pylons towering over the home, that "power lines are a reminder of man's ability to generate electricity."

This is the sort of movie the British used to make in black and white, starring Peter Sellers, Alec Guinness, Terry-Thomas, and Ian Carmichael. It's about characters who have a rock-solid view of the universe and their place in it, and gaze out upon the world in sublime contentment.

"Of all the films I've shown at Ebertfest, the audience probably loved" – Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert is Chicago’s own legendary, Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic. An integral part of the Chicago International Film Festival since its early years, Roger went on to form his Overlooked Film Festival in 1999. Now known simply as Ebertfest, the annual event highlights films both new and old that deserve wider attention or a fresh look by a new audience. Join us for this special presentation of The Castle, an Ebertfest film handpicked by Roger for Chicago.

The Castle will be presented as part of the special program, Roger Ebert Presents...: Information & Show Times

82 minutes

Austria

Cooking History Cooking History

Without the battlefield cook, there is no war—because without the cook, there is no food. Using the field kitchen as a lens through which to view the major European conflicts of the 20th century, this documentary allows the bakers, butchers, and chefs of the great European armies to recount their versions of history. Cooking History functions both as a fascinating lesson in the wartime kitchen and a pleasurable glimpse of some of its most animated characters.

Croatian, Czech, English, French, German, Russian, Serbian with subtitles, 88 minutes